The Wild Flowers of Jersey

The Wild Flowers of Jersey

Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands. Although only 45 square miles in area, it has a wealth of natural habitats and many wild flower species. This book is an introduction to these plants, covering over 120 of the most interesting of them, including many Jersey specialities. The author, a professional botanist, illustrates each species by at least one colour photograph; her descriptions include details of the history, uses and folklore of the plants with special reference to Jersey where appropriate. The book's small size makes it perfect to carry in a pocket or rucksack whilst exploring this beautiful and varied island.


.

Author: Deirdre Shirreffs
Publisher: Brambleby Books
Year of Publication: 2015
Format and Pages: Paperback 100pp
ISBN: 9781908241337
Retail Price: £9.99
Our Discount Price: £8.99

Sample text from The Wild Flowers of Jersey

Jersey Orchid (Anacamptis laxiflora), des pentecotes


This orchid is one of Jersey’s special flowers and makes a wonderful sight in the orchid field in St Ouen in late May and June. The purple flowers are well spread on the stem, hence the Latin name and the alternative name of Loose Flowered Orchid. It is not exclusive to Jersey being found in Europe and also in Guernsey. In fact, it is more common in Guernsey, but Jersey botanists named it first ‒ apparently the Guernsey botanists were a bit annoyed.


Jersey Thrift (Armeria arenaria) d’s iliets d’mielle


Both the Jersey and the Common Thrift grow in Jersey, turning the roadside at St Ouen’s Bay pink. The Common Thrift flowers in May and the Jersey Thrift flowers later, in late July and August. The Jersey Thrift is also distinguished by its taller flowering stems. It is originally from central and southern Europe and is not found in the other Channel Islands or Britain. Thrift plants are adapted to the dry seaside conditions by having a cushion of narrow leaves and very long roots which reach down to find water. Because of these adaptations, Thrift can also grow on mountains.


Ling, (Calluna vulgaris), d’la bruethe


This heather has smaller paler flowers than the previous species. It is common on cliffs and coastal heaths. Plants with white flowers are sometimes found, the ‘lucky’ white heather. In the past it was used for fuel, and the name comes from the Anglo-Saxon ‘lig’ meaning fire. The twiggy stems were also used for bedding and thatching, and made into brooms. Calluna comes from the Greek for brush. Bees love heather and make the nectar into a dark, strong-flavoured honey.

.
^ Top of Page ^

Reviews and readers' comments

The Wild Flowers of Jersey is a fascinating pocket-sized reference book suitable for experts, walkers and casual readers alike. --Jersey Evening Post


The photography is excellent and the book is really to be recommended as an introduction to Jersey's flora. It will enhance any walk. -- Alasdair Crosby, RURAL Jersey Country Life

^ Top of Page ^


Walking with Birds
Walking with Birds

A nature walk through a Cumbrian Valley
Making Garden Meadows
Making Garden Meadows

A practical guide  to creating a beautiful native wildflower meadow or a colourful area of cornfield annuals, in even the smallest of gardens.
Buzzing!  (paperback)
Buzzing! (paperback)

A potpourri of fun poems about small garden creatures and their colour portraits.